RANGE OF HEARING

Published on: February 20, 2024

Range of hearing

The audible range of sound for human beings extends from about 20 Hz to 20000 Hz.

Infrasonic Sound

Sounds with frequencies below 20 Hz are called infrasonic sounds.

  • Rhinoceroses communicate using an infrared sound with a frequency as low as 5 Hz.

  • Whales and elephants produce sound in the infrared range.

  • Earthquakes produce low-frequency infra-sound before the main shock waves begin. Some animals can identify this sound, and they get disturbed before earthquakes.

Ultrasonic sound or ultrasound

Frequencies higher than 20 kHz are called ultrasonic sound, or ultrasound.

  • Dolphins, bats, and porpoises produce ultrasound.

  • Some moths can hear the high-frequency squeaks of the bat so that they can escape capture when the bat is flying nearby.

  • Rats communicate by producing ultrasound.

Hearing aid

It is an electronic battery-operated device that helps people with hearing loss. It consists of a microphone and a speaker. The microphone receives the sound signal and converts it into an electric signal. The speaker receives that electric signal and amplifies and converts it into a sound signal. Then it sends it to the ear.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q1. What is the range of hearing in humans?

Ans: The range of hearing in humans typically spans from 20 hertz to 20,000 hertz.

Q2. Why is the audible frequency range important?

Ans: The audible frequency range is crucial for communication and experiencing various sounds in our environment. It allows us to perceive speech, music, and other auditory cues.

Q3. How is sound measured in terms of frequency?

Ans: Sound is measured in hertz (Hz), with one hertz representing one cycle per second.

Q4. What are ultrasonic waves?

Ans: Ultrasonic waves have frequencies higher than the upper limit of human hearing, typically above 20,000 hertz. They find applications in medical imaging, cleaning, and various industrial processes.

Q5. What are ultrasonic waves?

Ans: Ultrasonic waves have frequencies higher than the upper limit of human hearing, typically above 20,000 hertz. They find applications in medical imaging, cleaning, and various industrial processes.